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Thread: Twin wall for my burner flue?

  1. #25
    world class weeble medusa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trebor
    The first length of twinwall goes directly onto the output from the stove (with an adapter and rope-tape). The second length goes through the roof vent then the stove is moved in place underneath and the two are clipped together. Then I climb on the roof and put the hat on. This is the theory, as it hasn't actually been installed in the van yet...
    That sounds like one hell of a faff for a live in. And messy. How are you not going to get the ash/soot/chimney dust stuff everywhere when you dismantle it like that once its been used a few times? And wheres the stove going to be while youre driving if its not in situ?

  2. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by alices wonderland View Post
    Are you saying that there will be no water tight seal between the hole in your roof (roof vent?) & the stove pipe?
    Something I forgot to mention: the roof vent has a removable top cover (which will keep the rain out when the burner is not installed), and after I've put the flue pipe in I've got a rubberised flashing which I'll place over the flue before putting the hat on.

    Quote Originally Posted by medusa View Post
    That sounds like one hell of a faff for a live in. And messy. How are you not going to get the ash/soot/chimney dust stuff everywhere when you dismantle it like that once its been used a few times? And wheres the stove going to be while youre driving if its not in situ?
    The stove, flue, etc, will just be packed down somewhere in the back of the van when not in use (under the bed probably!). Take your point about ash and soot - will have to see how it goes with that one.

    Yes I agree, this would be a real faff if you were driving along and just wanted to pull into a layby overnight or something. But I'm just a "weekend hippie" I'm afraid, so van-living tends to be driving onto a field for a gathering of some kind and then leaving it there for the duration, then packing up and driving home again.

    Like I said this is early days for me so I'll let you know how it goes... maybe you'll find in 6 months' time that I've got fed up with it and just permanently installed the flue anyway ;-)

  3. #27
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    I am (healthily)jelous about your taking out bit!We finally installed our wood burner!It's gorgeous...but I think now the truck is more than 4 metres tall!

  4. #28
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    Tried to post a photo but either my computer sucks or I do!

  5. #29
    just me Colin M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cavegirl View Post
    Tried to post a photo but either my computer sucks or I do!
    I'm really trying not to say it.................
    Smile - It'll make them nervous.

  6. #30
    Noobie Rocknrolldog's Avatar
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    Ok guy's, i am a gas safe engineer so i'll try to explain what's what with chimneys. Most chimneys in domestic houses do not provide enough upward airflow (or draw) when they are cold. It's the simple fact that heat rises and so when we test a chimney with smoke pellets we light the fire and allow the chimney to heat up first. This causes much more air to be drawn up the chimney and means there's no chance of back draw bringing toxic fumes back into the room (or van) If your flue pipe is uninsulated and your van is cold the pipe may not be hot enough to efficiently draw the toxic fumes up and out of your vehicle. This is where the twin wall flues come in, they heat up rapidly and stay hot. Even if its really cold outside, the hot gasses will still exit fast enough and won't be cooled enough to sink back down the flue. It easy to say that single pipe chimneys work for you and you've never had problems but people have died in vans. People have died with BBQ's in the entrance to a tent so DO NOT TAKE THE RISK! Just because there's no smoke coming out of your burner doesn't mean there's no carbon monoxide leaking into the air you are breathing. A hot flue pipe can set fire to combustable material over 5 feet away, don't believe me ask the fire brigade!! One thing that is an ABSOLUTE MUST HAVE is a carbon monoxide detector in your van. you can get them for less than 20 now, that may be a lot to some but you are a long time dead. Do not trust advice from anyone who is unqualified to give it. Their intentions may be good and their experience may be true but every installation is different. Also, you must make sure there is sufficient ventalation to feed the fire with oxygen otherwise it will burn too slowly, cool down and you are back to square one. This also applies to a fire that is nearly out, it can cool the flue in cold weather and stop it.... well you get the idea by now. I am happy to give advice to anyone on any aspect of this subject but i can't do it in an official capacity as your installation in a van isn't covered under gas safety regs. Please don't take risks and be safe!

  7. #31
    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    Somebody talking really bad about Johno Regs man. Best about it we are all usually parked up in a smokeless zone & yet we are still burning our old boots to keep warm.
    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.

  8. #32
    exiled cornishman wandering gypsy's Avatar
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    haha steve,funnily enough just put my old wooden clogs on the fire

  9. #33
    [QUOTE=Rocknrolldog;120353} A hot flue pipe can set fire to combustable material over 5 feet away, don't believe me ask the fire brigade!![/QUOTE]



    Most of your post seemed sensible , but this statment seems dubious , yes a spark coming out of the top of your flue landing in a hay pile soaked in petrol on a windy day might present a fire risk., but I think if the flue its self was hot enough to ignite things 5 feet away it was because its melted.

  10. #34
    I'm not sure what relevance a Gas Safe registration for installing gas-fired appliances in dwellings is to wood-burning stoves in live-in vehicles.

  11. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by trebor View Post
    I'm not sure what relevance a Gas Safe registration for installing gas-fired appliances in dwellings is to wood-burning stoves in live-in vehicles.
    I guess it's with respect to the temperature of the flue and the drawing of air into a flame. But textbooks and reality don't always go together. We have a terrior that lives side by side with our house rabbit, both free range, according to all literature the rabbit should be alive no more! From what i've deduced on all of this is that so long as you fit (at least one) a carbon monoxide detector you're fine as you will know if anything is even approaching dangerous levels of gas ratios. Add in a spoonfull of common sense I was apprehensive when I fitted ours (I made I comment on a similar post not so long ago asking for advice) had it going alot all through night, alarm not muttered a sound, and we have a very small amount of flue outside the vehicle..
    speckledsunshine.wordpress.com

  12. #36
    exiled cornishman wandering gypsy's Avatar
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    5 FT? thats me and a lot of us buggered then, 5 inches more like.

  13. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocknrolldog View Post
    Ok guy's, i am a gas safe engineer so i'll try to explain what's what with chimneys. Most chimneys in domestic houses do not provide enough upward airflow (or draw) when they are cold. It's the simple fact that heat rises and so when we test a chimney with smoke pellets we light the fire and allow the chimney to heat up first. This causes much more air to be drawn up the chimney and means there's no chance of back draw bringing toxic fumes back into the room (or van) If your flue pipe is uninsulated and your van is cold the pipe may not be hot enough to efficiently draw the toxic fumes up and out of your vehicle. This is where the twin wall flues come in, they heat up rapidly and stay hot. Even if its really cold outside, the hot gasses will still exit fast enough and won't be cooled enough to sink back down the flue. It easy to say that single pipe chimneys work for you and you've never had problems but people have died in vans. People have died with BBQ's in the entrance to a tent so DO NOT TAKE THE RISK! Just because there's no smoke coming out of your burner doesn't mean there's no carbon monoxide leaking into the air you are breathing. A hot flue pipe can set fire to combustable material over 5 feet away, don't believe me ask the fire brigade!! One thing that is an ABSOLUTE MUST HAVE is a carbon monoxide detector in your van. you can get them for less than 20 now, that may be a lot to some but you are a long time dead. Do not trust advice from anyone who is unqualified to give it. Their intentions may be good and their experience may be true but every installation is different. Also, you must make sure there is sufficient ventalation to feed the fire with oxygen otherwise it will burn too slowly, cool down and you are back to square one. This also applies to a fire that is nearly out, it can cool the flue in cold weather and stop it.... well you get the idea by now. I am happy to give advice to anyone on any aspect of this subject but i can't do it in an official capacity as your installation in a van isn't covered under gas safety regs. Please don't take risks and be safe!
    Thanks for taking the time to post.
    Regards
    Box

  14. #38
    Hi, Trebor, Where did you get the flue and attachments from to make it collapsable? cheers

  15. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by jim11 View Post
    Hi, Trebor, Where did you get the flue and attachments from to make it collapsable? cheers
    It's not collapsible as such (not in the sense of being telescopic), it's two 1m lengths of twinwall and matching cowl with sprung-snap-fit straps which make it feasible to unclip and reclip. Jon from Windy Smithy sourced the flue for me and custom-made the top of the stove to be compatible with the flue (how good is that?!).

    I don't think it's robust enough to be taken down and put up hundreds of times, but as I'm a "weekend hippie" (at least for now) and only intend using this when I go to festivals and gatherings etc, I reckon it will work for me for the number of occasions I'll be using it.

  16. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by trebor View Post
    It's not collapsible as such (not in the sense of being telescopic), it's two 1m lengths of twinwall and matching cowl with sprung-snap-fit straps which make it feasible to unclip and reclip. Jon from Windy Smithy sourced the flue for me and custom-made the top of the stove to be compatible with the flue (how good is that?!).

    I don't think it's robust enough to be taken down and put up hundreds of times, but as I'm a "weekend hippie" (at least for now) and only intend using this when I go to festivals and gatherings etc, I reckon it will work for me for the number of occasions I'll be using it.
    Ok nice one cheers for that, am actually in the process of ordering some stuff from windy

  17. #41
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    Hi,
    sorry about my extremely late reply, I have been out of internet zone for a while...
    got a carbon monoxide detector and the wood burner works fantastically, tropical inside while super cold outside...great!
    Thanks for the advise!

  18. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocknrolldog View Post
    Ok guy's, i am a gas safe engineer so i'll try to explain what's what with chimneys. Most chimneys in domestic houses do not provide enough upward airflow (or draw) when they are cold. It's the simple fact that heat rises and so when we test a chimney with smoke pellets we light the fire and allow the chimney to heat up first. This causes much more air to be drawn up the chimney and means there's no chance of back draw bringing toxic fumes back into the room (or van) If your flue pipe is uninsulated and your van is cold the pipe may not be hot enough to efficiently draw the toxic fumes up and out of your vehicle. This is where the twin wall flues come in, they heat up rapidly and stay hot. Even if its really cold outside, the hot gasses will still exit fast enough and won't be cooled enough to sink back down the flue. It easy to say that single pipe chimneys work for you and you've never had problems but people have died in vans. People have died with BBQ's in the entrance to a tent so DO NOT TAKE THE RISK! Just because there's no smoke coming out of your burner doesn't mean there's no carbon monoxide leaking into the air you are breathing. A hot flue pipe can set fire to combustable material over 5 feet away, don't believe me ask the fire brigade!! One thing that is an ABSOLUTE MUST HAVE is a carbon monoxide detector in your van. you can get them for less than 20 now, that may be a lot to some but you are a long time dead. Do not trust advice from anyone who is unqualified to give it. Their intentions may be good and their experience may be true but every installation is different. Also, you must make sure there is sufficient ventalation to feed the fire with oxygen otherwise it will burn too slowly, cool down and you are back to square one. This also applies to a fire that is nearly out, it can cool the flue in cold weather and stop it.... well you get the idea by now. I am happy to give advice to anyone on any aspect of this subject but i can't do it in an official capacity as your installation in a van isn't covered under gas safety regs. Please don't take risks and be safe!
    Nice to see something on this subject written by someone who knows what they are on about.

  19. #43
    just me Colin M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johno View Post
    Nice to see something on this subject written by someone who knows what they are on about.
    So many answers................
    Smile - It'll make them nervous.

  20. #44
    Dirty Uncle Bertie... julianthegypsy's Avatar
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    I would like to see a flue pipe set fire to something five feet away. Perhaps if the five feet was outside and directly above it while someone was shovelling straw into the fire?
    Yawn I'm so tired with this big bag of coal on my head...

  21. #45
    just me Colin M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by julianthegypsy View Post
    I would like to see a flue pipe set fire to something five feet away. Perhaps if the five feet was outside and directly above it while someone was shovelling straw into the fire?
    Or perhaps it'it was originally written by someone who has studied the theory but never been in the real world?

    But who am I to comment?

    :-)
    Smile - It'll make them nervous.

  22. #46
    Dirty Uncle Bertie... julianthegypsy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin M View Post
    Or perhaps it'it was originally written by someone who has studied the theory but never been in the real world?But who am I to comment? :-)
    Well all I know is that if I wanted to light something, I really wouldn't stand five feet from a chimney and hope it caught, I think I'd be waiting a loooong time. Shame, the guy makes some sound points otherwise.
    Yawn I'm so tired with this big bag of coal on my head...

  23. #47
    exiled cornishman wandering gypsy's Avatar
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    he must be a fisherman, 5 ft ? 5 inches more like. If not we are all DOOMED

  24. #48
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    Ah the anglsey mile has struck, tis the dragon breath, I blame it on the brussels

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