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Thread: back to school blues

  1. #1

    back to school blues

    Hello all

    I can't be the only one feeling a little sad that we'll soon be back to the drudgery / monotony of the school run. I 'think' I'm starting to want something different for my kids, hence I've joined this forum for a bit of inspiration! I just feel they have very little freedom, things are very predictable, safe (which is good) but far from my vague perceptions of a happy, carefree childhood. Anyone else feel like this? Anyone feel they have achieved an idyllic lifestyle for their kids/family? Any thoughts welcome x
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  2. #2
    Heavenly Creature Rainbomama's Avatar
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    Hi jenniehen...my last child is about to go to the secondary school 2 doors up from home...so for the 1st time in 25yrs il not be got a school run...i toyed with home ed with him and the next child,but we found a real good,very small school and he done so well there...but....me and my new man are aiming to go mobile asap...so my boy will ,when we re sorted be coming with us and be...well was going to say taught...but it will be more gathering life experiences,exploring the world,and finding out about what interests him...we both have good knowledge in different fields...and knowing him...he ll be teaching us too,lol,what sort of changes were you hoping to make?xx
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  3. #3
    Ah found it! Moderator FriedOnion's Avatar
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    I hate the push towards every kid taking the same tests no matter where their ability lays. It's the kind of system that ignores talent in areas that aren't "valuable" and pushes out any child that doesn't fit in properly. Also the whole health & safety thing is barmy, no tree climbing, no running around, no being a kid...

    It's a tough question, if you feel that your kid may want to rejoin normal society, get a job and so forth then they may feel they have missed out on something by not having a conventional education. However I feel the best thing you can do for your child is spend time with them.

    I travelled a lot a few years back & came back to the UK at the time for my kids to have missed a lot of secondary education, they struggled initially but soon adapted & got good grades. They also picked up 1-2 foreign languages and some appreciation for the wider world. On top of that we're a lot closer than the average family.
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  4. #4
    UK Hippy Reiki Doula Editor Sarah's Avatar
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    Hi Jennie and welcome to UK Hippy
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    I know what you mean about that blue feeling.. i often get it after the shorter school holidays where i've just gotten into a rythym of home-ness with the kids and then they are back into the school routine. Have to say though that I have been looking forward to my two little ones going back to school this last few weeks, and they have been looking forward to it aswell. Mine have gone back into year 2 and year 1, the eldest is off at college doing his final year of A levels...

    I guess we're very lucky with the primary school here in that it has massive grounds and backs onto woodland and the school spend A LOT of time out doors... also the staff are all incredibly passionate and having fun is always a very obvious part of the school curriculum. School isn't for all children though so it's wonderful to hear parents allowing space for education beyond the traditional school setting.

    I hope you can find some inspiration here in the Alternative Parenting section. Families have written about home-school experiences, registering their children as nomadic so as to access part-time schooling arrangements, making the transition from school to home-ed etc. I've generally found most of the schools i've had anything to do with over the years, pretty flexible in terms of accomodating family requirements and am going to test the kiddo's school out next year as I want to take my two out for a week right at the beginning of the 2016 term, so they can come to work with me at a buddha field family camp... my friend said I should register us as being a buddhist family but I am totally NOT up for doing that... I don't describe myself as buddhist although spiritually i resonate with a lot of what buddhism has to say...wouldn't dream of labelling my children though as anything other than how they chose to label themselves in terms of religious or spiritual faith... think i'll just go in and have a meeting with the head and explain how much of an enriching experience it will be for them at the family camp and how they'll be attending field school every day instead of town school
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    Love Sarah xxx
    If we are to heal the planet, we must begin by healing birthing.

  5. #5
    Heavenly Creature Rainbomama's Avatar
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    A lot of times sarah,the head will be all up for any type of enriching experience....its the powers that be,above there head,you ll have trouble with.....my youngest starts secondry tomorrow,and although hes a smart lad,hes not that quick with his reading and writing...he d rather 'do' i can see problems ahead for him as i know a lot of work from now will be just copying,and it wont hold his attention...we ll see...if not he ll be out sooner than we planned xx

  6. #6
    My eldest seems to be pretty bright/academic, but he comes home from school very stressed.. it's a lot of noise & bustle, and not enough physical activity & FUN. Dread to think how my 3 year old will get on.. every time we come into contact with health visitors/teachers etc we get labelled as having one form of developmental delay/disorder or another. Sigh. He is the happiest, sweetest, naughtiest little thing, who just takes longer than "average" to learn things. I will be v tempted to delay school for him to allow him the time he needs to "develop" at his own pace.

  7. #7
    Ah found it! Moderator FriedOnion's Avatar
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  8. #8
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    I took my eldest son out of the state ed system last year. After 8 months of home ed I decided teaching was not as easy as it looked
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    Whilst I dearly love my sons, I am really happy for them to go back to school.

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