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Thread: Wood saw machine advice please

  1. #1
    just me Colin M's Avatar
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    Wood saw machine advice please

    I'm pretty sure this is in the wrong section, if someone could move it - I wasn't sure where to put it.

    My partner amongst other things, decorates wood slices - plaques if you like. We have access to much wood, dried and nice, but I need a means to cut it into slices that are the same thickness across. I had been thinking some sort of a band saw, but the trunks that need slicing can be a couple of feet across, and I'm not sure I can find such a thing.

    Can anyone please tell a complete idiot what sort of a machine I should be looking for? The better the finish that it is capable of the happier I would be as it will reduce the amount of sanding required before she either burns or paints the surface.

    Suggestions please?

    Thank you
    Smile - It'll make them nervous.


  2. #2
    Heavenly Creature Shroom's Avatar
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    worth a trip to local sawmills with said wood , cross their palms with biscuits maybe ?

  3. #3
    Walking back to happiness ma bungo's Avatar
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    Not cheap , depends on how much use it would get , but something along these lines ?


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  4. #4
    Walking back to happiness ma bungo's Avatar
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    There are considerably cheaper versions on ebay , and I have seen home made versions utilising ladders ! Maybe a look on you tube ?

  5. #5
    just me Colin M's Avatar
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    Ok, I have not explained myself at all well.

    I'm looking at cutting the slices across the trunk not longways down,

    I looked at chopsaws or bandsaws, but it's getting one that can cut up to 2 foot across.

    If that makes sense?
    Smile - It'll make them nervous.

  6. #6
    Love's the shire Offgrid hero's Avatar
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    A larger band saw or a chainsaw in a sawhorse with saw mount?.
    just a simple guy

  7. #7
    Walking back to happiness ma bungo's Avatar
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    Chainsaw with a steady hand
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  8. #8
    Chilling Out lupinthief's Avatar
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    A chop saw with 2ft capacity would be absolutely terrifying!

    I'd go with a chainsaw - and maybe a fixed pivot and saw horse to make a cleaner cut. Never going to be a perfect finish though. Might be cheaper and easier in the long run just to get a friendly saw mill to run a large batch through for you.

  9. #9
    Non of this matters NomadicRT's Avatar
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    For that size timber if youre doing it in volume you need a second hand industrial bandsaw or circular saw bench like a McConnell or Wadkin and your not talking cheap even well used old fetch many hundreds -even thousands( i used to have all kinds of machines but unless youre doing high volume youre better off doing a deal with a local sawmill as Shroom said or some older timber merchants who will have the kit necessary..alternatively if youre an experienced chainsaw user you can use one with a 30 inch bar or buy a suitable chainsaw jig like this link which will allow you to use a chainsaw like a chopsaw(you can also get jigs for using chainsaws to cut long planks and boards....its a cheaper option to buying sawmill sized kit)
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    You can finish off with a planner but again if you have a local sawmill they can do that for you for a fee when they cut the timber.
    Last edited by NomadicRT; 16-08--2016 at 12:22 PM.

  10. #10
    TUMTeeTum Moderator Chazz's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Colin M
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    I'm pretty sure this is in the wrong section, if someone could move it - I wasn't sure where to put it.
    No prob, I've moved this to 'creative arts'. As I'm someone who can never throw away a good looking slice of trunk, its art that I like. At Stonehenge once, I made hand painted badges consisting of a slice of branch with a badge pin glued to the back, my paintbrush work was poor enough to prevent me making a fortune
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  11. #11
    Walking back to happiness ma bungo's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Chazz
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    No prob, I've moved this to 'creative arts'. As I'm someone who can never throw away a good looking slice of trunk, its art that I like. At Stonehenge once, I made hand painted badges consisting of a slice of branch with a badge pin glued to the back, my paintbrush work was poor enough to prevent me making a fortune
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    I am very suprised anyone could detect poor paint brush skills at Stonehenge , more like 'wow ,moving design badges !'
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  12. #12
    Amateur photographer EnglishLens's Avatar
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    Contact someone in your local stationary engine club. You might find someone with a large sawbench who will cut them for virtually nothing for you, especially if he could do it at a show. I've got the stationary engines, but not the sawbench.
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  13. #13
    Non of this matters NomadicRT's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by EnglishLens
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    Contact someone in your local stationary engine club. You might find someone with a large sawbench who will cut them for virtually nothing for you, especially if he could do it at a show. I've got the stationary engines, but not the sawbench.
    what hengings do you have? i used to have some but all gone now..

  14. #14
    Walking back to happiness ma bungo's Avatar
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    What about those old fashioned 2 handled saws , would be a great work out too
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  15. #15
    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by ma bungo
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    What about those old fashioned 2 handled saws , would be a great work out too
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    I have a couple of those two man crosscut/felling saws. If you want to play with them Colin.
    What thickness of slices are you hoping to cut?

    Often, more often than not, when you crosscut from the log/truck. The rounds will star shack. It's all about how well seasoned the wood is and type of wood. While its left in situs it's under tension. Soon as you cut through those fivers, the tension changes and further drying out occurs. Star shake emminate from the center outwards and usually splits to the outer edge.

    There are many methods to try and reduce these splitting problems and some people speed seasoning in a microwave to avoid shakes etc. Restricted by the size of your domestic microwave.

    I used to cut thin slices 5mm to 10mm thick slices for a artist friend in green timber logs. He would then (within a couple of hours after first sawing the slice) burn a image or pattern into the wood. Then leaving the slice to dry out naturally and it would then split/ twist or cup, further adding to the uniqueness of the piece.
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  16. #16
    Non of this matters NomadicRT's Avatar
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    I never let my 'rounds' dry out properly.Id leave them stackedclose together like they were still part of the trunk and work them as i wanted carve /burn plane sand,leave them to dry out a bit, slowly,then give them a good soaking in Swedish deck oil.If you treat them every year with deck oil they last for years.Sometimes splitting adds character but personally i didnt like it.Id try to stick to using hard dense wood like oak yew or cedar...ive used quite a lot of reclaimed hardwood boards from renovations too,all the splitting and ageing is usually done and has plenty of character which comes out when its worked.
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  17. #17
    Heavenly Creature
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    Originally Posted by ma bungo
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    What about those old fashioned 2 handled saws , would be a great work out too
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    When I were a lad, in the 1960's, we used to use one of they beggars, believe it or not. Hard work it were, if you were at it all day. Now a museum piece, by the look of it
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  18. #18
    Walking back to happiness ma bungo's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by oldkeith
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    When I were a lad, in the 1960's, we used to use one of they beggars, believe it or not. Hard work it were, if you were at it all day. Now a museum piece, by the look of it
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    I had a couple that I sold to a pub to put on the wall, I bet like all saws ,if they need to be super sharp
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  19. #19
    I would have thought a bandsaw with a jaw as big as you need cut fitted with a resaw guide would be an ideal reasonably economical answer to Colin's question. Circular saws tend to be quite large and heavy for the depth of cut you can get.

  20. #20
    Turning On
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    Colin's other 'alf here, thanks for all the advice, plenty to think about. Alices Wonderland i prefer slices of around 10-20mm thick. Nomadic RT i always use hard woods such as yew and oak, got a big lump of cherry at the mo that i want to slice.
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  21. #21
    Non of this matters NomadicRT's Avatar
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    Cool...cherry and rosewood were my favorites but hard to find in decent size and quantity.Yew and cedar is getting difficult to find too.
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  22. #22
    Walking back to happiness ma bungo's Avatar
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    I like holly , I made a nice spinning chair out of it .
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  23. #23
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    I'm really looking forward to getting stuck into the cherry, love working with it. I managed to get hold of a heap of yew which is lovely, but i've never used cedar or holly.

  24. #24
    Walking back to happiness ma bungo's Avatar
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    Holly has a nice dense grain ,which works well green, but can go a bit grey as it seasons, I cut one down with a trunk about 15" round, and roughly ripped the trunk into planks with a chainsaw. Does have a bit of a tendancy to crack if its left to dry to quick .
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