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Thread: Sleep - What price would you put on it?

  1. #1
    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    Sleep - What price would you put on it?

    Sleep - the time we switch off and recharge.

    I set my alarm for 6.ooam this morning. Carboot sale. I like to retire to my pillow around midnight, if not earlier these days (I am not old, just boring). I wake often throughout the night to change position. Sit up, stand, undertake genital posture excercise, massage or take medication. Pain is constant and inturups my sleep.

    In the past, I had no problems and could sleep well in any environment except for extreme cold.
    I also liked to burn the candle at both ends and often only managed 4 to 5 hours sleep in 24 hours.
    Back in my late 20's and 30's when I heavily drank alcohol and enjoyed many late night drug fuelled sessions. I could stay in bed the following morning, to either waste away the hours sleeping or hope the hangover would disappear.
    During my late 30's and 40's my attitude to sleep and early mornings changed. I was excited about my work life and would be at work most days, sometimes 7 days a week for years at a time. I was fitting in my home life and free time around work life. So my body clock was the only alarm clock I relied on.
    In my early 40's I found I couldn't stay in bed for long in the morning. I was frightened of missing something I guess.

    For the last 5 years or more with increased disturbed sleep, I'm finding restfull sleep is so valuable and necessary.
    This morning when the alarm clock went off at 6.00am. I nearly said bugger it, I'm staying in bed. 6.15am the alarm clock went off again. So I tore myself from the warm bed and pillow. This personal struggle got me thinking.

    SLEEP We all need it, we all have similar routines. We probably all have different attitudes to sleep throughout our lives.
    So if sleep had a hourly rate attached to it. In other words, if we had to purchase sleep (like we allow an employer to purchase our awake time)
    1) How much would you Pay yourself per hour to sleep?
    2) How much would you want paying per hour to sleep?
    There is a slight difference in the two questions. (2nd question) If it was a lockdown situation (no books, no sex, no TV) and you were made to retire to your bed, for a set sleep period 5 to 8 hours per night at a set time. Like clocking on, but clocking off.
    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.
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  2. #2
    I love my sleep, I go to bed around 12am and get up at 8am, it is the time pattern my body likes. I also love going to sleep because I enjoy my dreams and if you remember them and pay attention to them they tell you a story which helps you in your waking life.

    I couldn't put a price on sleep either to pay myself or to pay for sleep, because to me my sleep is priceless.

  3. #3
    Transcending
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    I really enjoy my sleep, I dream vividly every night too, usually multiple dreams. So, I'd pay to sleep if sleep was optional, just for the dreams.

  4. #4
    Heavenly Creature
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    A different price every night (or day), depending on quantum of sleep deficit, physical/mental fatigue, etc. Bad back doesn't help, that's for sure!

  5. #5
    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dollybassett View Post
    I love my sleep, I go to bed around 12am and get up at 8am, it is the time pattern my body likes. I also love going to sleep because I enjoy my dreams and if you remember them and pay attention to them they tell you a story which helps you in your waking life.

    I couldn't put a price on sleep either to pay myself or to pay for sleep, because to me my sleep is priceless.
    Wow Dolly, priceless? You are very rich indeed then. I know many people who lay hours in the dark, frustrated because their mind won't shut down. I believe we can help ourselves by having a sleep routine. Body clocks are wonderful things if working correctly. I can wake minutes before the alarm goes off. If I fall to sleep say watching a film, the material (speech) can really influence my dreams. I wake totally out of sorts and feel cheated. I've just started to leave the radio on (radio 4) during the night. As yet. It's not been any intrusion, unlike light and sound combined. I reciently purchased a lumie bedside light combined radio. If certain light frequencies can help simulate spring sunrise, on dark or dull winter mornings it may just help me to get over a confusing nights sleep.
    Theres been loads of sleep research over the years and results suggest we allow time to sleep and time to wake to function better. There are points in a sleep cycle where it's not beneficial to be brought out of sleep. Same with afternoon naps. They say 20 to 40 minutes is better for us, more invigorating than several hours sleep.

    When I left school I worked down a coalmine on a 3 x shift system. The day shift killed me. 5.00am start on a Monday, 6.30am start for the remaining days. On Wednesday I would write off the afternoon to catch up on sleep, otherwise I couldn't keep my eyes open in the dark warm environment down the mine.
    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.

  6. #6
    Jesus is not your friend Fire-Tree's Avatar
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    Since I started this new job, I've been unable to sleep properly. I've got bags under my eyes and my body is aching.

    How much would I pay for sleep? I don't think I'd be able to afford it, as ideally I sleep for a solid 9 hours. At the moment I'm averaging a disturbed 6. That being said, I would exchange my hourly wage directly for an hours of sleep. I couldn't afford any more, but if necessary, I would cut down on everything else for that sleep.

    As for question two. I'd volunteer
    Blog: Experiencing England in a car with no money
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  7. #7
    I definitely feel our bodies like routine when it comes to sleep, my body does get confused and I feel groggy if I go to sleep later than 12 am, and I feel it all the next day.

    Many moons ago I had a job where I started at 7am, I used to get up at 5.30am, I had to leave after 6 months because my health was affected, so my pattern now is get up at 8am, in work by 10am, I would rather work late than do an early start.

    I often wonder if night workers get proper sleep during the day.

  8. #8
    Heavenly Creature
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    Old saying about hours of sleep, six for a man, seven for a woman, eight for a child and nine for a fool. Or something like that.

  9. #9
    Heavenly Creature
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    Quote Originally Posted by dollybassett View Post
    I often wonder if night workers get proper sleep during the day.
    I never did, 12 hour nights were hard, zombie after first month. Met a man who worked nights since 1947 (in 68), he did not get on with wife.

  10. #10
    I also think our bodies are very sensitive to our bedrooms and that can affect sleep quality, it is one reason I love my van, because if I am staying somewhere new or visiting family, then my bedroom stays the same, and I do sleep very well in my van.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Brynhyffryd View Post
    I never did, 12 hour nights were hard, zombie after first month. Met a man who worked nights since 1947 (in 68), he did not get on with wife.

    I think I would probably have got a new wife

  12. #12
    Womble MacMac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dollybassett View Post
    I definitely feel our bodies like routine when it comes to sleep, my body does get confused and I feel groggy if I go to sleep later than 12 am, and I feel it all the next day.

    Many moons ago I had a job where I started at 7am, I used to get up at 5.30am, I had to leave after 6 months because my health was affected, so my pattern now is get up at 8am, in work by 10am, I would rather work late than do an early start.

    I often wonder if night workers get proper sleep during the day.

    Did nights in a few different jobs the longest 2 yrs. Took quite a few months to get back to restful sleep.

  13. #13
    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boaty McBoatface View Post
    I really enjoy my sleep, I dream vividly every night too, usually multiple dreams. So, I'd pay to sleep if sleep was optional, just for the dreams.
    I sometimes woke at a point in a dream and hurriedly relaxed just to get back to the same dream. It's brilliant when I do get back to the same dream. The dreams that do wake me up most are not necessarily dreams I want to go back to or remember. Strangely they are on a similar thread, if not identical to (nightmare) dreams I've had many times before. That just sucks having the same bad dreams over and over again. The mind should develop tools to either prepare me for the recurring situation (bad dreams) that I can experience over and over again. Like make sure I have a weapon at hand or learned new skills like Kung-fu etc. Personal recurring bad dreams should be like watching a film. If I remember walking out of a cinema and I walk into a lamppost, I don't expect to do it again, should I go back to the same cinema & watch the same film the following day. I would expect to be aware of the lamppost and avoid it. I can't seem to apply that logic to any of my recurring bad dreams. If you get my drift?
    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.

  14. #14
    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dollybassett View Post
    I often wonder if night workers get proper sleep during the day.
    I don't think they do, especially if they live with family members.
    I requested nights regular after struggling with the 3 x shift system. I managed nightshift for over 12 months. In winter it was difficult as it could be dark when I went to work and still dark when I get home in the morning.
    But again a routine saved the day and nightshift fitted in well with my lifestyle. Work throughout the night 6.15am shower, breakfast. 7.00am home to take my dog out for a walk. 9.00am out with my horse. The day was my own. Midday/afternoon, I could go to sleep until family tea time. 7.30pm socialise (pub) 9.30pm off to work.
    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.
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  15. #15
    Jesus is not your friend Fire-Tree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brynhyffryd View Post
    Old saying about hours of sleep, six for a man, seven for a woman, eight for a child and nine for a fool. Or something like that.
    Well that's settled, I'll be sleeping for 10 hours from now on.
    Blog: Experiencing England in a car with no money
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  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by alices wonderland View Post
    I sometimes woke at a point in a dream and hurriedly relaxed just to get back to the same dream. It's brilliant when I do get back to the same dream. The dreams that do wake me up most are not necessarily dreams I want to go back to or remember. Strangely they are on a similar thread, if not identical to (nightmare) dreams I've had many times before. That just sucks having the same bad dreams over and over again. The mind should develop tools to either prepare me for the recurring situation (bad dreams) that I can experience over and over again. Like make sure I have a weapon at hand or learned new skills like Kung-fu etc. Personal recurring bad dreams should be like watching a film. If I remember walking out of a cinema and I walk into a lamppost, I don't expect to do it again, should I go back to the same cinema & watch the same film the following day. I would expect to be aware of the lamppost and avoid it. I can't seem to apply that logic to any of my recurring bad dreams. If you get my drift?
    Dreams fascinate me, I met my granddaughter in a dream about 2 years before she was born, and in the dream I just had a knowing that she would be born a few years later, which is exactly what happened. Also have you noticed in dreams we speak to each other telepathically. I love lucid dreaming, I had a great one a few months ago where I visited a house I used to live at, I was with my friend in the dream and I told him to hurry up because I could only control the dream for so long, I was able to meet my dead dog Benson and go around the house and garden before I had to go.

    Great thread AW.
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  17. #17
    Heavenly Creature Lightbringer's Avatar
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    I didn't appreciate sleep and lie ins until I did 4 hourly feeds with two babies that took an hour to feed


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  18. #18
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    I worked shifts for years and years, the worst by far was 4 on-4 off, 2 x 12 days then 2 x 12 hr nights. Ruined my health, social-life, and marriage, my body-clock is still messed-up. To be fair though it was kind of my choice to do that, so my fault really, it must be hellish for someone like Alice who has ​ to endure shit sleep because of an old injury
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  19. #19
    Me gone,bye bye.. NomadicRT's Avatar
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    Yes i have every sympathy for anyone who cant sleep through pain as ive been there for years with my back injury so it was either pain that woke me or the sodding withdrawal symptoms from the opiate painkillers i was on.I weaned myself off them eventually and do a lot of exercise and have mansged to keep. the psin down so i dont get woken up but its not slwsys possible especially now i have a new source of pain and its not something thsts possible or works for everyone.Quality sleep is important and lack.of it can make a huge difference to your life....it can make it great or ruin it.
    Last edited by NomadicRT; 17-12--2016 at 03:08 PM.
    Hebridean at heart..everywhere else is just somewhere on the way back there...
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  20. #20
    Womble MacMac's Avatar
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    Best thing I use to help sleep is lavender oil - just a drop on a pillow.
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  21. #21
    Transcending Ecobob's Avatar
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    I took a job once that was 2 weeks of nights followed by 2 weeks of days with weekends off.
    I struggled from the off, I remember being ok till it was 'lunch' time and I went outside to see pitch black sky, it was all I could do not to walk out, felt so weird.

    I don't think I really slept that well in the day as there was usually a distraction of some kind. The having weekends off was also odd as you then have to adjust back to daytime routine.

    Can't say I miss that job at all, The money was good but there's more to life than a good wage.
    Any resemblance to actual persons living, dead, or undead, is purely coincidental
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  22. #22
    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lightbringer View Post
    I didn't appreciate sleep and lie ins until I did 4 hourly feeds with two babies that took an hour to feed
    That must be so hard. Having had two of my kids breastfed. On the Odd occasion when I actually heard my first kid calling at night & being a bloke, I was never one to sit up and give mum company while they fed. So slept through. With our new baby, I'm the one who notices the baby waking & I will wait until mum gets the baby either feeding or settled off to sleep again. Us blokes don't know how lucky we are and how easy we have it. How you manage to wake up and function on a morning after no sleep (poorly kids) is behond me. Mothering females have superpowers.
    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.
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  23. #23
    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    The other week I was listening to a radio 4 program about garden plants and Datura was mentioned. Someone said that 'Some culture in some Country? would put Datura leaves under or on their children's pillow. To help get the kids off to sleep, but also stressed that the Datura had to be removed soon as, to prevent something happening? ( too deep a sleep? Or tripping maybe?)
    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.

  24. #24
    Afloat ... or adrift? marshlander's Avatar
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    Sleep ... I remember that
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