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Thread: Should we be allow euthanasia

  1. #25
    Heavenly Creature
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    after seeing a relative in pain for some time and he asked doctor to give him something to end it i think we should have the option or watching a man no respones to talk wetting fouling himself being fed by a tube dribbling head to one side im sure we should
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  2. #26
    Radiant Being emmadilemma's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by convoy
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    after seeing a relative in pain for some time and he asked doctor to give him something to end it i think we should have the option or watching a man no respones to talk wetting fouling himself being fed by a tube dribbling head to one side im sure we should
    This is similar to how my Grandad died of bowel cancer..while literally begging for someone to end his life. He refused iv fluids and spent just short of a week dehydrating to death. If you allowed your dog to die in this way you'd be seen as cruel and possibly even be prosecuted..
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  3. #27
    Heavenly Creature Wulfie's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Brynhyffryd
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    What's CHC?
    Continuing Health Care. It's NHS funded as opposed to Social Care due to the 'nursing' element. It's a real fight to get hold of unless the person concerned is 'end of life'.


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  4. #28
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    This sort of suffereing should not be allowed, even if euthanasia is not allowed, palliative care is supposed to be available. Maybe the circumstances described were not recent - I certainly hope so. Very painful memories for you emmadilemma and convoy.

  5. #29
    Radiant Being emmadilemma's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Brynhyffryd
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    This sort of suffereing should not be allowed, even if euthanasia is not allowed, palliative care is supposed to be available. Maybe the circumstances described were not recent - I certainly hope so. Very painful memories for you emmadilemma and convoy.
    It was at least 10 years ago maybe more. He went downhill very fast so was in a normal hospital rather than a hospice type place. They gave him extra morphine in the end...but it literally was right at the very end when he wasn't conscious anymore anyway.

  6. #30
    In short, yes. Absolute minefield though.

  7. #31
    Heavenly Creature cricket's Avatar
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    To end in hospital like that is awful.my aunt was in terrible pain,they put her in a sideroom as "she was disturbing other patients"I was on the ward pestering for 5 hours for morphine for her but they refused "as there need to be 3 signatures for morphine and we are low staffed"She refused her insulin herself as she was a diabetic and knew she would end in a coma.The hospital nursing sister phoned me at about 2am to say "she has gone,but we couldnt be sure of the time as she was in a side room and she had been missed on the ward round".Just awful,I wont ever forget the distress.

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    Originally Posted by emmadilemma
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    It was at least 10 years ago maybe more. He went downhill very fast so was in a normal hospital rather than a hospice type place. They gave him extra morphine in the end...but it literally was right at the very end when he wasn't conscious anymore anyway.
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  8. #32
    Euthanasia has many interpretations and connotations.

    Every able bodied person reserves the right to end their own life by their own hand. This can be considered as voluntary euthanasia or suicide depending on the context and interpretation of the individuals mental health.

    Involuntary euthanasia is something else entirely.

    Elders approaching the possibility of terminal ill health are encouraged to state their wishes as best they can during a.gp consultation.

    All individuals can specify terms of what should or should not be treated in a living will.

    A person who would choose voluntary euthansia or suicide but does not have the bodily ability to complete is unfairly treated by current law. Should the law change who is going to push the button?

  9. #33
    Peace Practitioner! Cobra's Avatar
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    As long as the individual is of sound mind,and can make the decision themselves,I can't see a problem with it.I listened to a story on Radio 4 last year,about a 75yr old ex nurse,who had spent most of her working life taking care of elderly patients.She had seen enough suffering over the years to know that if she ended up not being able to look after herself,she would struggle to accept it.I think from memory,when her own health began to deteriorate,she chose euthanasia.
    I know I would choose it myself.I'd rather die while relatively healthy,than die a slow drawn out,in some hospital.
    My own father had an awful death.He at first was diagnosed with lung cancer,after many years of smoking.He had half his lungs removed and was told the prognosis was fairly good.He was 61.He had to give up work,and life went ok for a little while.However,he began having fits.An emergency visit to the hospital confirmed he had a brain tumour.He never came out of the hospital.He was taken to the hospice ward,where he spent the next 2 mths laying in a bed,unable to look after himself.Had he had a choice,I think my father would of chosen euthanasia when he was first diagnosed.I was with him,on my own when he took his last breath.

  10. #34
    I watched a programme a few years ago about a guy who had 'locked in' syndrome, caused by a motorbike accident.
    He was (before the accident) a real free spirit.
    Loved bikes, adventure, and lived life to the full.
    In discussions previously, he had always been very adamant that he would not want to live, should anything curtail his activities and ability to be totally independent.
    His family were distressed that the guy was being kept alive by artificial means, and were fighting to fulfil his wish to be allowed to die.
    As time drew near that a decision was to be made, attempts were made to communicate with him, and after some time it seemed that he actually responded to questions posed.
    Gradually it was established that he actually could answer simple questions with meaningful responses.
    E.G - he would be asked "you enjoy soap operas, don't you?" to which his response would be a definite "NO!!".
    "Is it true that you hate soaps?" Response "YES!" and so on..
    After putting various questions to him, in various ways, over the course of many months, his situation was explained to him, and the idea of being allowed to die was introduced to him. His responses each time, and however the idea was put to him, showed that he was now vehemently against the idea. His family were astounded, but forced to face the fact that his view had changed. Food for thought..
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  11. #35
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    My sister-in-law developed Motor Neurone Disease, and as she could see her quality of life fading fast, decided to go to Dignitas in Switzerland. It's a long and expensive process to be accepted, and dragged on for months causing heartache and many arguments for the family left behind, some of whom still suffer from the experience. My ex suffered a nervous breakdown, and the whole experience probably led to our marriage collapsing. So while I think the option of euthanasia should be available, there are many side-effects to consider.
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  12. #36
    That's so sad.. for everyone involved. Just how it was for the family of the guy in the programme.
    Motor neurone disease is pretty horrific.

  13. #37
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    Originally Posted by Uncle jhad
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    My sister-in-law developed Motor Neurone Disease, and as she could see her quality of life fading fast, decided to go to Dignitas in Switzerland. It's a long and expensive process to be accepted, and dragged on for months causing heartache and many arguments for the family left behind, some of whom still suffer from the experience. My ex suffered a nervous breakdown, and the whole experience probably led to our marriage collapsing. So while I think the option of euthanasia should be available, there are many side-effects to consider.
    Really sorry to hear that UJ!Thats pretty sad.Its always worse for the people left behind for sure.I think if it were any of my family,and they chose that option,I would like to think I would respect their decision,and that their own suffering would be coming to an end.Of course everyone handles it differently,and I truly respect that too.

  14. #38
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    It was like being told a loved one had died, but the body isn't released to the family for over 6 months. It wreaked havoc on the more emotionally imaginative in the family, as they awaited news of "the date".
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  15. #39
    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    I could have helped my dad slip away. He had morphine administered via a pump into his chest. They left me in charge of the box of morphine amps over night. He died once in my arms, but then kicked back into life. I sat with him for another 4 hours untill he eventually died. He was only 56. I miss him most days but he wouldn't have let any animal suffer. The nurse counted up all the morphine amps in the morning on her arrival. Then infront of me she broke every amp into a bucket. If I had known I would have split them between me and my dad. My dad would look after my Cannabis plants growing in the back garden when I was a young lad. What a man.

    I heard a conversation on the radio about a TV series called "call the midwife" they spoke to real, retired hospital staff during their research for the programme". It turns out that in the days when I was born. 1950-60's If a baby looked too poorly to live, they would place the newborn child in the untility room on the draining board (worktop) to die. If it was winter they would open a window to bring on the death quicker, if it was summer they would keep the window closed and refuse to give the newborn child a sip of water. It really squeezes my guts just thinking about it.

    At one extreme we have heartless bastards with suicide bombs and the other a well meaning NHS death by convenience & yet we can't help a poor bastard who's suffering to die with dignity. Messed up, proper messed up. If anyone of us were to help a loved one take their own life or help them to die. We could never tell anyone about it.

    I'm suprised there's not a service available on eBay, with free delivery. Highest bid wins. Ebay seller drives round to Margaret's Bungalow with a package. Makes her a cup of tea or pop a syringe into her fun tubes and drive off back to monitor the eBay account. Special service to hospital inpatients, Sunday visistor times within the auction price. I can actually see that service being abused.
    "Excuse me, are you Margret? Do you have a eBay account? Do you know your password? Oh good" I haven't thought who would give feed back.
    Last edited by alices wonderland; 24-01--2017 at 08:15 PM.
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  16. #40
    I've seen situations at the very end of someone's life when morphine is administered, knowing that it will shorten their time. Years ago when my dad was dying, a doctor made him up a little tot of brandy with a concoction in it.
    He told my mum that my dad would drift off to sleep and not wake up. Blessed relief, as dad was suffering terribly. He was 47.
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  17. #41
    Peace Practitioner! Cobra's Avatar
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    Oh Miss_bee thats sad!I hope when its my time to go,its in my sleep.

  18. #42
    Fingers crossed, eh Cobra? I think we all hope that'll be how it ends. Sad in this day and age that it often doesn't, I suppose?
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  19. #43
    Heavenly Creature parrotandcrow's Avatar
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    When I brought my son home for the last time, he had a morphine line in his chest, and I was given complete control of the morphine. I did not realise that I had tacit consent to give him as much as needed (he was in a terminal coma) and didn't have the courage to overdose him. I had two other children to care for and was scared that I would go to prison and leave them with a dead brother and no mother.

    When he finally did die, the nurse who came didn't even check the morphine bottle, but poured it down the sink, which is when I realised that I had had a choice.

    I was very sad that I had not helped him to leave sooner, then; as had he been a dog I would have had him put to sleep.
    If men bore wings and had black feathers, few would be intelligent enough to be crows.
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  20. #44
    Oh my word, parrot, how awful. The same with my aunt though.. I'm so sorry for your loss.
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  21. #45
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    Just suppose that the person is hugely disabled, for example, by a stroke and wants out - no chance under current law. But after a couple of weeks, the fighting spirit returns and a year or two of life is experienced before something else carries them away.

    After the initial shock of finding themselves stripped of their mobility, dignity, maybe even the power of speech, they have risen out of depression and decided to live, a choice which would be denied them if euthanasia was available on demand.

    What price pride eh?

  22. #46
    Heavenly Creature parrotandcrow's Avatar
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    Thank you Miss Bee, but it's a long time ago now, and that really does make all the difference. It's only his physical presence which is gone, he's still around and still a joker.

    Incidentally, your username is my daughter's nickname. She even has a private plate on her car which spells it out. Makes me smile every time I see you online.
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    If men bore wings and had black feathers, few would be intelligent enough to be crows.
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  23. #47
    What about people who suffer from depression? Not just a 'bout' of it, but years and years of life limiting depression.
    Would that be considered a reason to consider euthanasia, if that's what they wanted?

  24. #48
    Ah, thanks miss parrot. Glad it cheers you to see my name! How lovely that you sense your son around. That cheers me no end too. Just lost my mum before Christmas, and hoping she is around too!
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