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Thread: Misophonia anyone suffer from this?

  1. #1
    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    Misophonia anyone suffer from this?

    Ever since I was a teenage lad, I've noticed that some people eating some food types in close proximity to myself could make me feel a rage and a overwhelming desire to act in the fight or flight mode. With me it was when I first heard my mum eating cornflakes. The noise of 'munch, munch munch' was one of the worst environmental noises I've yet to react to.
    Ive heard people say that fingernails dragged accross some surfaces, or the sound of chalk on a blackboard can be upsetting. Breaking up polystyrene etc. Not having had a adverse reaction to any of the latter three. I have been stumped with my own thoughts and reactions to noisy eaters. My partner was 'munching' on a tube if smarties the other night while I was sat quietly reading. The same overwhelming feelings of fight or flight came over me. I had to ask my partner what she was eating that could make such a loud unpleasant sound. It sounded like a horse munching on a endless bucket of carrots.
    A few weeks ago on radio four. Some discussion was going on about people who had a similar reaction to people making some noise when eating and mentioned a scientific name for it. Misophonia. Misophonics (people who are effected by these kinds of sounds) have been found to have more fatty tissue round nerves (enlarged area in the brain) and this is possibly the reason some sounds are amplified and become annoying to Misophonics. Since this was largely unknown about in 2000 and following research given the name in 2013.
    Ive extracted some info from a article I've found online. https://www.newscientist.com/article...ple-with-rage/

    Imagine feeling angry or upset whenever you hear a certain everyday sound. It’s a condition called misophonia, and we know little about its causes. Now there’s evidence that misophonics show distinctive brain activity whenever they hear their trigger sounds, a finding that could help devise coping strategies and treatments.

    Olana Tansley-Hancock knows misophonia’s symptoms only too well. From the age of about 7 or 8, she experienced feelings of rage and discomfort whenever she heard the sound of other people eating. By adolescence, she was eating many of her meals alone. As time wore on, many more sounds would trigger her misophonia. Rustling papers and tapping toes on train journeys constantly forced her to change seats and carriages. Clacking keyboards in the office meant she was always making excuses to leave the room.

    Now it seems there may be a neurological explanation for this. Sukhbinder Kumar and his team at Newcastle University, UK, carried out a series of tests on 20 volunteers with a severe form of misophonia, as well as 22 people who don’t have it. Both groups listened to neutral noises, like the sound of rain; unpleasant sounds, such as a baby crying; and sounds that were triggers for the misophonics, such as chewing or breathing noises.
    While both groups reacted to the neutral and unpleasant sounds in a similar way, the misophonic group experienced increased heart rates and skin conductance – both signs of the body’s fight-or-flight response – when they heard trigger sounds.
    Brain scans revealed that the misophonics had heightened activity in the anterior insular cortex (AIC), an area known to play a central role in the system that determines which things we should pay attention to. When the trigger sounds were played, there was not only more activity in this region but also abnormally high levels of connectivity to other regions. “The AIC is hyperconnected to structures that are involved in emotion regulating and memory,” says Kumar.
    There was also increased connectivity to regions involved in the default mode network, which helps summon memories and processes internally generated thoughts. In misophonics, one of these regions, called the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), had a higher level of myelination – fatty sheaths that surround nerve cells and help conduct their signals – which may explain the greater connectivity.
    My boy this Christmas commented about one of our guest who came for Christmas diner. My boy said he eats with his mouth open and is noises. Although his breathing did not bother me, It reminded me of some of my earlier experiences. When our guest sat with us to eat another meal. I made a point of listening. It wasn't the noises of eating food. It was our guest breathing noises while he eat. This got me wondering if our boy suffers from misophonia also and that his trigger sounds are different to my own.

    Its early days with research but Im aware that every now and then I will find sometimes people eating certain things when in audible range will have the same effect on me, I'm too polite and have no right to ask it tell people to stop eating or eat quietly. However infuriating Or unpleasant I may find it.
    Im wondering how many other people are effected by everyday sounds/noises?
    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.


  2. #2
    I used to get cross with my daughter when she was eating toast (with her mouth shut)
    For some reason, the sound used to come out of her head! It drove me mad, and probably spoiled her breakfast many a time. I would quietly glare at her until she said "WHAT? WHAT?!"

  3. #3
    TUMTeeTum Moderator Chazz's Avatar
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    The sound of a stiffly bristled broom sweeping concrete is one that still gets me. It's almost as if I experience it as something more than just an audible sound. As a kid, I'd get a similar reaction if my nails accidentally brushed along brickwork, that usually occurred when I was cycling and had put a hand out after losing balance.

  4. #4
    On holiday with an ex and his parents, I could hear the sounds of his dads false teeth making a little clicking sound with every chew. It made me feel quite nauseous.

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    TUMTeeTum Moderator Chazz's Avatar
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    Last night there was a programme featuring a man who had taste reactions to words he read, apparently brain connections between the part of his mind that deals with words and the part that deals with taste hadn't broken away when he was a baby. That 'break' of connection is a normal occurance for nearly all of us.
    No idea if this is actually a similar thing.

  6. #6
    How about polystyrene? The whole experience of the sound, the feel, the idea of scratching at it until it squeaks?

  7. #7
    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chazz View Post
    Last night there was a programme featuring a man who had taste reactions to words he read, apparently brain connections between the part of his mind that deals with words and the part that deals with taste hadn't broken away when he was a baby. That 'break' of connection is a normal occurance for nearly all of us.
    No idea if this is actually a similar thing.
    That's mad. But there are so many weird anomalies people experience with brain wiring. The idea alone of dragging fingernails accross brickwork is gut wrenching. I must admit never to have tried it. I always put the flat of my had out to stop me falling off my bike when up against a wall. Have you ever found a musical note or chord have a adverse effect on you?
    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.

  8. #8
    I cannot listen to modern jazz. It's too discordant for me. My mind seeks symmetry in sounds. Its almost painful when I hear jazz.
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    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miss_bee View Post
    I used to get cross with my daughter when she was eating toast (with her mouth shut)
    For some reason, the sound used to come out of her head! It drove me mad, and probably spoiled her breakfast many a time. I would quietly glare at her until she said "WHAT? WHAT?!"
    I get what your saying. It's a emotion that could get us into trouble quite easy. I could imagine taking the food away from a child or force feeding the child just to get the experience over quickly.
    Ive just found a support forum for sufferers & a few weeks ago I thought I was alone.
    http://www.misophonia.com/
    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.

  10. #10
    I just clicked on the link and it mentioned being enraged by foot tapping. My grandson does that, and yep, I'm irritated, if not enraged. I have to stop him.

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    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miss_bee View Post
    I cannot listen to modern jazz. It's too discordant for me. My mind seeks symmetry in sounds. Its almost painful when I hear jazz.
    Can I ask you to try a experiment? Can you download a few Frank Zapoer albums and see if you find those unpleasant! Unpleasant isn't the word I'm looking for. Some people just don't like his music. But he plays with some amazing musicians and is very tight with the work he produces. It would just be interesting to know if it's a Jazz for the sake of Jazz that upsets you or the way some music is arranged. With Frank Zapper you can't really tell with just a few tracks.
    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.

  12. #12
    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miss_bee View Post
    How about polystyrene? The whole experience of the sound, the feel, the idea of scratching at it until it squeaks?
    Lots of people hate polystyrene for some or all of the reasons you have mentioned. I don't gave a problem with it. Nor do I have with squeaky balloons.
    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.

  13. #13
    Yep, i'll be happy to try that. I've always been a bit nonplussed about how people with otherwise good taste can enjoy jazz. I've wondered what I'm missing. Be a good experiment, thanks.

  14. #14
    I sometimes bite my fingernails, but I've a friend who absolutely hates it, as she claims she can't stand the nibbling sounds. It makes her physically heave.

  15. #15
    I suffer from misophonia
    Now where did i put the bleedin mobile phone this time?
    Last edited by treestump; 19-02--2017 at 01:47 PM.
    I do most of my own stunts because the stunt guys show me how.
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    Heavenly Creature cricket's Avatar
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    Every noise my ex makes.
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    Heavenly Creature cricket's Avatar
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    Different sorts of jazz.Ive heard jazz of the 60s/70s and some is so dischordant and lacking apparent rhythm I fail to understand how it can be replayed live and how it could been enjoyed.Other jazz has logic and rhythm.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miss_bee View Post
    Yep, i'll be happy to try that. I've always been a bit nonplussed about how people with otherwise good taste can enjoy jazz. I've wondered what I'm missing. Be a good experiment, thanks.

  18. #18
    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miss_bee View Post
    Yep, i'll be happy to try that. I've always been a bit nonplussed about how people with otherwise good taste can enjoy jazz. I've wondered what I'm missing. Be a good experiment, thanks.
    I wouldn't put Zapper firmly in the Jazz camp but his bizarre arrangements may reflect similar to a none Jazz lover. To really enjoy Jazz it helps if you can first experience Jazz live and with lots of alcohol inside you. The skill and perfectionism of stringed instruments in Jazz is astounding.
    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.
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  19. #19
    Jazz always seems to feature very trumpety bits. I dont enjoy that, its a harsh sound, generally.

  20. #20
    Batshit Crazy. groove's Avatar
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    the noise that things that have been through a dishwasher make when they rub together or if you catch your fingernail on them, and the sound of cutlery squeaking on plates when people press too hard with it.


    *bleurgh*

    both of those make my fillings jump about.


  21. #21
    Afloat ... or adrift? marshlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chazz View Post
    ... a man who had taste reactions to words he read ...
    That sounds like synaesthesia. The French composer, Messiaen, experienced sounds and combinations of sounds as colours.
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    Afloat ... or adrift? marshlander's Avatar
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    I can think of two experiences in particular of people's eating sounds raising an unexpected and unwarranted angry response in me. I was on holiday with a friend when I was eighteen. We sat in the back of the car we had been driving to have something to eat. The sound of him chewing his segments of orange drove me crazy. I had to say something and, of course, he was offended. The second example I can think of is the sound of my father slurping his soup. He had been brought up to think that was the way to do it and again I was appalled at my own enraged response to the noise. I thought that was a reflection of my feelings about him at the time, but maybe it wasn't ...

  23. #23
    Afloat ... or adrift? marshlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cricket View Post
    Different sorts of jazz.Ive heard jazz of the 60s/70s and some is so dischordant and lacking apparent rhythm I fail to understand how it can be replayed live and how it could been enjoyed.Other jazz has logic and rhythm.
    I think pretty much all jazz has logic (even if sometimes it is a logic only within the piece's own rules) and like most music it will mostly have rhythm. What some people experience as a lack of rhythm is often polyrhythm (i.e. more than one metre played simultaneously) or consecutive mixed metres (e.g. where the music changes from 4s to 5s to 11s or whatever). Lurking underneath even the most florid extemporisation there is often a pulse. Jazz, like so-called modern classical music, is often highly cerebral, where the composer explores a concept rather than a more traditional harmonic progression. I have composed several pieces in this way, even though I prefer most of my music to start with melody. I appreciate not all people can listen to it. If I don't have the knowledge to work out a composer's or a player's intentions I have to rely on responding to the music on an emotional level until something I can analyse kicks in. Fortunately, I have always seemed to have an ear to be able to listen to music that some others call discordant. Often I find it deeply satisfying. There is often a richness that may be missing in primary chords alone. Once, in a restaurant in Belfast I opted for a starter of deep-fried Camembert with a raspberry sauce. I had never had anything like it. It sounded so unusual and I could not imagine what it would taste like, so I had to try it. The moment it hit my taste buds, though, a huge smile hit my face (or so a friend tells me!). This is how I often respond to new and unexpected music.

    There is, though, some music that doesn't seem to have a point, to me, beyond the deliberately obtuse or the deliberately commercial and I find that more difficult. Sometimes I find the effort of persevering with it rewarding.

    I listened to gamelan music for many years with great enjoyment, but no understanding. It was only when I started to play the music myself that I learned how it was constructed and knew how to listen more deeply and to derive more satisfaction. When people try to tell me that music is a universal language, that is my response. I don't believe it is. A couple of decades ago I was asked to record a favourite band's song for a tribute cd. I chose to rearrange the music and play it in the form of a Javanese lancaran. The resulting recording turned out to be longer than the producer wanted so they chopped my music in a very arbitrary place showing no understanding of the form. That rather upset me. I'd have cut it down myself, but I would have done it so that at least the form would make sense ... unlike most of this post I suspect
    Last edited by marshlander; 19-02--2017 at 02:46 PM.
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  24. #24
    Someone should make a tune out of false teeth clicking, toast munching, nails scraping brickwork, incessant foot tapping, plate scuffing..
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