THIS WEBSITE NEEDS YOU - SERIOUSLY!
This website has been in arrears for some time & will not survive unless donations remain consistent! We currently have over 17500 members & if everyone contributed we would never need to ask for money again. However, we appreciate not all of you are in the same financial position but we regularly run at a loss, so if you can afford to, please consider donating. The progress bar is arbitary & resets every month & there is a thread on running costs here.

Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Dragonfly in our Garden

  1. #1
    Turning On naturalspirit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Near Warrington
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    77

    Dragonfly in our Garden

    Never seen a dragonfly in our garden before but this one visited us last year so I took some photos.


    To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 1 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



    To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 1 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    The following users think this post is groovy: Cobra, NomadicRT


  2. #2
    Radiant Being emmadilemma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Gloucestershire
    Gender
    Female
    Age
    43
    Posts
    6,409
    Lovely! I love seeing them in the summer especially the really brightly coloured ones...remind me of fairies
    To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 1 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    The following users think this post is groovy: cricket

  3. #3
    Divine Light gomphus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    London
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    22,725
    Lovely photo! In case you're interested this dragonfly is an immature male common darter. Females + immatures are this colour but when the male is mature it's a bright orange-red colour + one of the most numerous dragonflies of late summer + fly well into the autumn. Usually the last species on the wing. I've never seen one later than November but exceptionally the odd individual is reported in December- usually in the south-west.

    Do you have a pond? If you haven't + have room even for a tiny one it can be a a haven for amphibians + insects like dragonflies as well as a drinking/bathing magnet for birds + mammals.
    The following users think this post is groovy: Brynhyffryd, cricket, naturalspirit

  4. #4
    Turning On naturalspirit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Near Warrington
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    77
    Thanks for the great information Gomphus, We don't have a pond at the moment. We did have a pond about 5 years ago which we made into a nature pond but unfortunately we have lots of trees just around it and it just turned into a swampy leaf thing after a year or two and we spend most of our time trying to fish all the leaves out so we filled it in.
    We do have a wheelbarrow full of water for the birds though
    To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 1 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

  5. #5
    Divine Light gomphus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    London
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    22,725
    Yeh, shady ponds tend to be good for mosquitoes + not much else!

  6. #6
    Transcending Cobra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    N/A
    Gender
    Female
    Posts
    751
    I'm thinking of having a small pond.Do you have to use a pump though?I would use some aquatic plants,is that enough without a punp?Is it as simple as digging a hole and covering with pond liner?TIA

  7. #7
    Heavenly Creature cricket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    By a tree,near the mountains.
    Gender
    Female
    Posts
    2,216
    It depends on the space you are willing to give for a pond and what you want in it.I have not used a pump but have put pondweed in it for oxygenation,duckweed appeared on its own but does need fishing out a bit if it gets too rampant.Look up some nature ponds and find one that appeals to you.Nowadays we always put a thick polythene below the actual liner to stop stone punctures from beneath.Allowing a shallow ,walk/crawl out each end for things that fall/are in and want to leave.When leaves started falling we covered the pond 6 inches above water level with that green windbreak netting stuff which stopped most of it.It can be very simple.My son put a polythene sheet in a dippy in a wood when small,we are now on the 12th generation of happy frogs,but recently upgraded to bigger,cleaner more accessible.The frogs still go to the original too though.
    To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 1 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

    To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 1 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    Originally Posted by Cobra
    To view links or images in this forum your post count must be 1 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    I'm thinking of having a small pond.Do you have to use a pump though?I would use some aquatic plants,is that enough without a punp?Is it as simple as digging a hole and covering with pond liner?TIA
    The following users think this post is groovy: Cobra

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •