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Thread: Crowdfunding (adapted live-in vehicle)

  1. #25
    Heavenly Creature r3ubs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wulfie View Post
    Was it this one, looks great but only a short vid.
    http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/...lt-mobile-home
    Yep that's the one. It really was a superb build and brought a tear to my eye :-)

    Series 6, Episode 2.

    http://www.channel4.com/programmes/g...mand/62967-002
    "My religion is very simple. My religion is kindess."
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  2. #26
    Non of this matters NomadicRT's Avatar
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    Providing a single disabled person with a vehicle to live a mobile lifestyle is relatively easy and affordable if you were to buy an ex welfare bus such as an iveco Irisbus and convert it partially to a camper for oneself.There are plenty of elderly able disabled couples who holiday like that in a variety of vehicles.

    You perhaps even manage for a couple of persons with disabilities to travel that way together if both were capable enough to support each other..I think.on the sort of scale youre envisaging you would most likely need a purpose built full size coach.They are already about with twin lifts,accommodation for disabled people and the required able bodied suppprt staff.
    The problem being on that kind of level -even if its only a small number travelling together its going to prove a hugely costly operation and complex logistically.

    Ive always thought that kind of option for the disabled to travel or go on treks and pilgrimages and not have to worry too much about how theyre going to manage as theyve got able bodied support and a driver to assist, is a fabulous opportunity but there are not many such options purely because of the expense and legalities and care requirements that need to be met.

    I think it might be of help if you got in touch with jumbulance,theyve been providing disabled travel for all kinds of reasons for many years (pretty sure since the 80's as i nearly drove for them before i joined the NHS).Theyre probably the most experienced and the best to advise you on your ideas before you make any firm plans. http://www.jumbulance.org.uk/what-we-do/
    Their operation may not be on the scale youre looking at but theyre best placed to advise on the implications.
    Last edited by NomadicRT; 12-03--2017 at 11:17 PM.
    Hebridean at heart..everywhere else is just somewhere on the way back there...
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  3. #27
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    you beat me to it NRT...was going to mention Jumbulance......they sold one of their vehicles on Ebay not too long ago...about 10k I seem to remember, a lot of vehicle for the money, but Mercedes parts costs are eye watering. As you rightly say, the logistics and operational legislation for that kind of thing enter into a different ballgame. The equipment they come with is impressive....stretchers all down one side with seats opposite, kitchen area to the rear, even a shower for the driver in one I saw a good few years ago. The bulk of their work, I believe, was running trips to Lourdes. 
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  4. #28
    Non of this matters NomadicRT's Avatar
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    They used to have an huge articulated coach but ive no idea if they still do.Ive seen some coaches on ebay fully equiped for disabled travellers for between 5 and 10k but running one contunously and msintaining it to a safe level for disabled users would prohibitively expensive unless youre a charity like Jumbulance.
    I think its a lot more realistic and doable if a couple of disabled friends -or a small group perhaps -bought a suitable ex welfare vehicle bewteen them and converted it and shared the use of it or a rota basis and shared the maintensnce and running costs.
    The only possible financial draw back is how it may affect claimants who get PIP and DLA for their disability...the way benefits agencies look at peoples disabilities and ability to work they could easily say well if youre capable of using a minibus to travel around in then youre capable of work and they stop your financial support...so then you need an independent income.
    All of these inplications need serious consideration.
    Hebridean at heart..everywhere else is just somewhere on the way back there...
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  5. #29
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    This one..


    People hiring the Jumbulances can choose where they want to take them as they pay a fixed price per day to hire the Jumbulance and the drivers.
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  6. #30
    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    That is one awesome vehicle for poorly people. When I first hurt my back. My bed was upstairs at the front of a double decker bus & after several days being bed ridden. I thought to myself, thank fk I still have my eyesight & if I were no more than a head on a pillow, there's still so much in life that is precious and fulfilling. Even just looking out of the bus windows at all the horses out in the paddocks, the fox trying to sneak accross the field without attracting the attention of my dog out playing (chasing) rabbits below me. Two little owls sat on a fallen Oak tree trunk, eating ants and pecking under the rotting bark for grubs.
    The coach in the photo must have brought so much pleasure and apprehension/worry/fear to so many of the users. Worth every penny it cost, no doubt.

    that would be a wicked ride to Glass-tonbury festival. Just get out of bed when we get there.
    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.
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  7. #31
    Wowzers!! That bus is awesome Thank you very much for your guidance, I am going to contact them and ask for their advice. Most definitely wont be anything like that kind of scale but hopefully they can give me some pointers and advice. I imagine its crazy expensive to travel with these guys though, certainly way above my kind of budget and that's something that I would like to change, making it accessible for those that don't have the luxury of spare money too. I fully intend the loan out the bus to disabled and those with a disabled family member completely free of charge, maybe with some kind of donation towards the running and upkeep costs. They would obviously be liable for the fuel costs and pitch costs etc whilst they have the bus in their care. All things to think about whilst I firm up and flesh out the plans.

    You're very right about the considerations for PIP/DLA Claimants, anything that could give a cause for taking away the financial support of a person unable to work is a very important matter... Your suggestion of a couple or few folk sharing the use/maintenance etc of the vehicle is very good too

  8. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by alices wonderland View Post
    That is one awesome vehicle for poorly people. When I first hurt my back. My bed was upstairs at the front of a double decker bus & after several days being bed ridden. I thought to myself, thank fk I still have my eyesight & if I were no more than a head on a pillow, there's still so much in life that is precious and fulfilling. Even just looking out of the bus windows at all the horses out in the paddocks, the fox trying to sneak accross the field without attracting the attention of my dog out playing (chasing) rabbits below me. Two little owls sat on a fallen Oak tree trunk, eating ants and pecking under the rotting bark for grubs.
    The coach in the photo must have brought so much pleasure and apprehension/worry/fear to so many of the users. Worth every penny it cost, no doubt.

    that would be a wicked ride to Glass-tonbury festival. Just get out of bed when we get there.

    Isn't it just
    I totally get what you said about appreciating the things you could still see whilst you were bed ridden.
    Been there myself and it's really good for the soul to still be able to enjoy your surroundings whilst unable to move from them.

  9. #33
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    Thanks for your kind comments, Nell,.....your enthusiasm is infectious!!
    Not sure if it will be of any use directly but this gives an idea of what is already out there which might help to get the ball rolling (no upfront cost).....could be possible for weekends away if those going didn't mind camping.
    https://www.communityfirst.org.uk/community-first-services/community-transport/minibus-hire

    This one's the first I found, but there must be others. Rodders.
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  10. #34
    Heavenly Creature
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    Don't forget, when you loan out the bus, they need to be insured and qualified to drive it, even if you aren't insuring them yourself. It's a legal obligation for you as the owner to make sure they are.
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  11. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by vanwoman84 View Post
    Don't forget, when you loan out the bus, they need to be insured and qualified to drive it, even if you aren't insuring them yourself. It's a legal obligation for you as the owner to make sure they are.
    Thank you
    That's certainly on my list of items to consider. I'm going to contact various insurance companies and find out the price for some policies that would cover various drivers. Obviously the loanee will need to have the appropriate license for the bus too.

  12. #36
    Heavenly Creature
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    I suspect you might get a shock when you get some quotes.
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  13. #37
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    I'm sure that you're absolutely right VW, insurance costs/difficulties have probably scuppered many similar schemes.
    How about engineering some sort of timeshare or co-ownership setup.....it works for boats.
    Another possibility might be to form a body (charity/club) that would own and operate the vehicle and have a policy for acredited/vetted members to drive it. This would also provide a "destination" for funds/donations and a means to transparently manage same. There is a Stroke Club near me that does just that with their wheelchair bus. Rodders.
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  14. #38
    Comfortably Numb Rick69's Avatar
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    Rather than building a van, why dont you look at building a trailer using a large box or catering style trailer as a base. With built in rear roller shutter access should be relatively easy, you can build it out either to suit a range of disabilities or even make it modular so that the layout could be moved around or added to as required to suit particular needs.

    This would get you round the insurance problem, all the users would have to do is either own or hire a tow car, and have the correct licence. Another option would be to do this but you build a cheap van specifically for yourself, and you tow the trailer to a site and you stay in the van, your client stays in the trailer.
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  15. #39
    Heavenly Creature
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    Towing brings problems of it's own though. For towing you either need a pre 1997 license or to have passed a towing test. I am still shocked as to how many people don't still know the laws regarding towing.
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  16. #40
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    From the Caravan Club....

    What can I tow? (on an ordinary car licence)

    Licence obtained before 1 January 1997: Combined car and caravan outfit up to 8250kg

    Licence obtained after 1 January 1997: Combined car and caravan outfit up to 3500kg

    Over 70 years of age (provided licence obtained before 1 January 1997): Only vehicles that can be safely towed by a 3500kg towing vehicle



    ...so not entirely out of the question for those with post '97 licences, although trailer/caravan weight would need to be monitored carefully.

    Rick's suggestion is a good one.....and a lot of disabled folk already have a means of getting to places....just nowhere to stay when they get there.
    Rodders

  17. #41
    Comfortably Numb Rick69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vanwoman84 View Post
    Towing brings problems of it's own though. For towing you either need a pre 1997 license or to have passed a towing test. I am still shocked as to how many people don't still know the laws regarding towing.
    I did state in my post "and have the correct licence" Once you have built the trailer it will need plating, so it would be relatively easy to check potential users licences if its going to exceed 3.5t gross combined.

  18. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by vanwoman84 View Post
    Towing brings problems of it's own though. For towing you either need a pre 1997 license or to have passed a towing test. I am still shocked as to how many people don't still know the laws regarding towing.
    I was in the understanding that if your licence is after 1997 you can tow but only up to 750kg without needing a towing test.

  19. #43
    Heavenly Creature
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    Sorry I should have said to tow anything usable. 750kg is nothing when it comes to a caravan. Remember that's total weight, not just the trailer. It's also your clothes and food, anything you put in it.

    By the way have you seen this thread?

    http://www.ukhippy.com/stuff/showthr...t=crowdfunding

    Maybe you could pool ideas?

  20. #44
    Not Quite a Noobie
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    I know what you're saying although if you haven't got a tow licence there are 2/4 birth caravans out there that weigh considerably under the 750kg mark with some just weighing as little as 500kg. I had a nice little caravan that weighed 650kg before I got my van as I haven't got a tow licence myself. The reason I haven't got it now because of my physical impairments so I couldn't hitch up myself. With the right van adapted they can certainly be more user friendly for anyone with a disability. I think this bus conversion is a great idea Hippy Nell & I'm looking forward to see it come to fruition. If I think of anything I could add to this project I will do good luck with it Hippy Nell

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