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Thread: Books on Foraging!

  1. #1
    Transcending Cobra's Avatar
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    Books on Foraging!

    I'm beginning to become interested in Foraging.Can anyone recommend a good book to start with?I have enquired about any foraging courses in my area,and unfortunately atm,there is none available.Any help appreciated,thankyou.
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  2. #2
    Walking back to happiness ma bungo's Avatar
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    Food for Free, Richard Mabey.
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    Transcending Cobra's Avatar
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    Thanks Ma,will look for that book today.

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    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    Edible Mushrooms: A Forager's Guide to the Wild Fungi of Britain and Europe - Geoff Dann

    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.
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    Heavenly Creature
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    Originally Posted by ma bungo
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    Food for Free, Richard Mabey.
    You beat me to it Ma. I read this as a kid, and the knowledge stayed with me
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    .
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  6. #6
    Walking back to happiness ma bungo's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by vanwoman84
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    You beat me to it Ma. I read this as a kid, and the knowledge stayed with me
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    .

    Me too
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    I got it when I was 14 back in 74, I believe there is a new improved version now . The hawthorn leaves did not taste like their namesake bread and cheese LOL!

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    Radiant Being emmadilemma's Avatar
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    I have several books including food for free but find online sites to be the most helpful in identifying plants. I mainly use the wild food uk site ...they have a great online directory of all the common edibles with several pictures of each plant. They also tell you any plants that look similar to avoid confusion..

    I've been eating loads of Spring greens the last few weeks. Easily identified plants for starting out that are around at the minute, are hairy bittercress, chickweed, wood sorrel, wild garlic, nettles, garlic mustard , ground elder, wild primrose and Hawthorne. Wood sorrel is my favourite it has a fizzy kind of citrus taste
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    I have some nice tried and tested recipes if you want them.....have a lovely one for nettle and wild garlic soup..
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    Transcending Cobra's Avatar
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    Thanks so far for your recommendations,which I have noted.Emmadilemma,the website you suggested is really good so thankyou for that.Any recipes,I'd really appreciate thankyou.
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  9. #9
    Heavenly Creature
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    Hmmmm! Wood sorrel! That is nice, sorry veggies it's great with rabbit.

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    Shed Junkie alices wonderland's Avatar
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    Learning the processing techniques for the storage of these seasonal foraged ingredients is the next step. Making pesto, freezing, drying etc. Something's are just best eaten fresh and as such when available. Young leaves and the petals of flowers are a must to explore. I'm down in Wiltshire and I've discovered a ginkgo tree. A living fossil 270 million years unchanged. These Trees are unique. Theres x6 seed groups on the Earth. 5 of these are related to one or many other plant and tree species growing today. ginkgo is not. It has no other related species on the planet and is considered an endangered species. The leaves are very high in vitamin C. The seeds/nuts are widely used in Eastern (Chinese) medicine. However for some reason the West use only the leaves in herbal medicine. A tiny % of the population are allergic the the toxins present in the seeds, so caution is advised.
    even a gypsy caravan is too much settling down.

  11. #11
    Green around the gills ThreeMoons's Avatar
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    I've got one or two books with foraging chapters in them, I've learned most of what I know from local people where ever I have been at the time. For example how to find Winberries but how to avoid the horrible little replica that gives you a bad stomach etc. Where to find the best seaweed that makes lava bread and so on.

    Now I've had a crash course (unofficial over a brandy or two) with the local hunters who take great pride in instructing me how to spot an edible snail, what mushrooms are good and what to avoid, where the best asparagus grows and so on.

    It's been far more beneficial than a book - is there a group you can join?
    Years may wrinkle the skin, but to give up on your dreams and ideals, wrinkles the soul.

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